Feeding A Horse with Gastric Ulcers.

Feeding A Horse with Gastric Ulcers.

There’s lots more talk around Gastric Ulcers recently, with statistics showing that up to 90% of Racehorses and up to 40% of Leisure horses may be affected. With these shocking statistics, we’re looking at how we can feed horses with Ulcers and ways we can help prevent them occurring in the first place. What are Gastric Ulcers? Gastric Ulcers are nasty and painful ulceration’s which can develop in the horses stomach lining. What are the Symptoms of Ulcers? There are lots of symptoms of Ulcers and it can be hard to pin point a horse having ulcers without consulting a vet and having your horse scoped. Usually things such as loss of weight or inability to hold weight, Colic and loose droppings, and in some cases poor attitude, e.g being difficult to girth. So what causes Gastric Ulcers? In order to understand how Ulcers occur, we must first look at how the horses digestive system is set up to eat. Nature designed horses to live out in vast open spaces, where they would have to forage for up to 20 miles a day in a herd to find add adequate water and food. Because of this horses are designed to ‘trickle feed’ where they eat short and small amounts of grass and food constantly. This produces saliva, which together with the feed gives the stomach something to digest. Without this, the stomach acid has nothing to work with, and thus, sits against the stomach lining and causes Ulcers. High Speed Exercise on an empty stomach can cause a similar reaction, as the gastric content gets thrown around in the...
News From Reybridge Eventing

News From Reybridge Eventing

We’ve had a very exciting few weeks since our last Newsletter, including a 2* win, a weekend in Holland, the babies at Badminton, David’s first ride in the 2017 3* ERM series, and the u25 National Championships. And not forgetting that Travelling Head Groom Jade Roberts was voted ERM Supergroom at Chatsworth – very well deserved as Chap looked amazing. Our first trip in April was to Oudkarspel in northern Holland with Jane and Ian James’ Eisfee (Alice) where she finished in 5th in the CCI2*. Next stop Bicton Arena (Devon) with six horses, which were rather scattered across the three days, meaning quite a lot of driving up and down but it was worth it. Carneyhaugh Rua (Roly), Dunge’s Don Perignon (Don), Ferro Point (Ferro) and Rainstown Star (Duncan) were all entered in the Intermediate. Duncan did a great dressage test (27.1) but had two down SJ, and David decided to withdraw from quite firm going XC and save him for Chatsworth. Meanwhile Don, Ferro and Roly all had mid-30s dressage marks and went into the showjumping very evenly matched. Ferro had a double clear and minimal time faults XC to finish 5th.  Don and Roly had one and two down respectively, and a few more time faults to finish 15th and 16th. Gillian Jonas’ Chap was another withdrawal after dressage – also going to Chatsworth (see more below) – but Gillian’s other horse, Shannondale Quest (JJ), was in second after dressage in the CIC2* and despite a pole down, David really went for it XC. JJ duly obliged and galloped as fast as he needed to, finishing...
Blue Chip All Star Academy Week 5 Competition!

Blue Chip All Star Academy Week 5 Competition!

The Blue Chip All Star Academy is coming to an end already *Sob Sob* with the last episode airing at 9pm on Sunday 25th June! There have been happy tears and sad ones, and so far we’ve watched the All Stars be put though their paces in Dressage, Jumping, and have their knowledge of bits, equestrian media and rider safety scrutinised.   We’re celebrating the Blue Chip All Star Academy week 5 with an amazing prize giveaway! Including prizes from Horseware, Sue Carson Saddles, Rockfish and Blue Chip Feed! To be in with a chance of winning, follow the link and enter your details! – http://eepurl.com/cS-2Yf Good Luck!...
Whats the best way to nutritionally support your Laminitic?

Whats the best way to nutritionally support your Laminitic?

Lami season is well upon us and finding the right feed suitable for your Laminitic prone pony or horse can be hard. Some people think that you should avoid feeding Laminitics all together through spring and summer to avoid weight gain or excessive feed intake and this is not only false but could actually leave your pony deficient in vital vitamins and minerals that are essential for their overall health and well being. Being proactive in ensuring your horse doesn’t get laminitis can be crucial, and starting them on a Laminitic suitable feed can help protect them from potential bouts of Laminitis. -Laura and Harvey (above) Harvey is fed on Blue Chip Lami-Lite to keep him trim and in shape. What are the causes of Laminitis? There are many causes of Laminitis, Conditions such as PPID and EMS are closely linked to Laminitis, but some people don’t realise that a simple change in environment can affect your horse in such a way. Keeping your horse trim and away from high starch and sugar feeds is a way to protect him / her from the dangers of Laminitis. Here are some of the main causes of laminitis explained: High intake of Starch and Sugar. Otherwise known as Soluble Carbohydrates if an large amount of Sugar and Starch is ingested it causes an overload in the digestive system. Bacteria breaks this down but causes acidity in the hindgut which in turn kills the bacteria. As the bacteria die they release toxins into the gut. These toxins disrupt blood flow, which can cause laminitis.      2.   Stress Many people don’t realise that stress can cause laminitis. Changes in...
Madison Jamison jumps to victory in Blue Chip Pony Newcomers Second Round at The College Equestrian Centre, Keyose

Madison Jamison jumps to victory in Blue Chip Pony Newcomers Second Round at The College Equestrian Centre, Keyose

Madison Jamison jumps to victory in Blue Chip Pony Newcomers Second Round at The College Equestrian Centre, Keyose   It was a busy weekend at The College Equestrian Centre in Keysoe, Bedford as they played host to a Pony Premier Show. With a large field of eighty-one starters coming forward to contest the Blue Chip Pony Newcomers Second Round, it was Madison Jamison who proved to be the eventual winner.   With just two Horse of the Year Show tickets on offer for this October’s Blue Chip Pony Newcomers Championship Final, each of the competitors started the class with high aims. In the first two rounds, the course asked some questions of the ponies and riders and left just thirteen to go head to head against the clock in the final jump-off.   Sixteen year-old Madison Jamison from Knuzden, Blackburn gave the winning performance on board Flavia, a 7 year-old brown gelding owned by Nicola Jamison. This partnership rode the fastest treble clear of the class stopping the clock over 3 seconds ahead of their nearest rivals in 41.93 seconds.   Jumping into second place was Faye Sutton, aged 15, from Whitchurch, Shropshire riding Beyond Doubt II a 13 year-old roan gelding owned by Angela Davies. This combination left all the fences standing to claim a treble clear in 45.23 seconds.   The riders and ponies that finished in third to fifth took home the chance to compete in the Blue Chip Pony Newcomers Masters at the British Showjumping National Championships.   The College Equestrian Centre, Keysoe – Sunday 11th June 2017 Blue Chip Pony Newcomers Second Round 1st...