12 Top Tips for Doing a Good Show

12 Top Tips for Doing a Good Show

1 – Asses your horse’s strengths and weaknesses. Practise your show at home and see what works best for you and your horse. Keep it simple, keep it short. 2 – Listen to the judge or steward and be prepared to do a different show to the one you have practised if so requested. Watch what the competitors above you do. 3 – Be ready for your turn to do a show, make sure your horse is concentrating and is on the bit. 4 – Make sure your horse will stand still at the beginning and end of your show. 5 – If you have to stand in front of the judge before you start your show, ride up to where the judge is, don’t let them walk to you. 6 – If your horse does not move straight don’t trot straight towards or away from the judge. 7 – When at home make sure your horse will easily strike off on the correct leg in canter as soon as you ask him, but do not let him anticipate the change, he must wait for you to ask him. At all times he must stay nicely on the bit and not chuck his head around, or lean on you and open his mouth. 8 – It is more correct in a show to change the canter lead through three steps of trot, but if your horse has a fantastic trot, you may want to use this opportunity to show it off by trotting across the diagonal. 9 – Use the space available to you to the best advantage so...
Top Tips for Training a Show Horse

Top Tips for Training a Show Horse

1 – Training a show horse is no different to training any other kind of horse, know what you want to achieve and be very black and white with your horse, so he understands what you want. 2 – One of the best horse trainers in the world from the Swiss Knie Circus told me “The horse is never wrong; it is just that we have not explained it to him properly.” 3 – Repetition is the key to training any horse, once the horse understands what you want he will remember it. 4 – Reward your horse when he has done well, all animals learn more quickly when this method is used. A reward may not necessarily be in the form of a tit-bit, but may be by removing the pressure, for example letting your horse walk on a long rein. 5 – Take your time, some horses take a bit longer to learn than others. 6 – Go to a trainer or a professional show rider to give you some lessons. However good you are, you need a pair of eyes on the ground to help you improve. 7 – Go to one of the many showing clinics or to a training show. 8 – Take your horse to a dressage competition before the show season starts, it’s a nice, quiet way to get your horse going in the company of others whilst warming up, for your test. 9 – Your horse must learn to carry himself and work in a nice, light, steady contact. He must be responsive to the aids and be a pleasure to sit on, you will only achieve this through correct training....
Feeding for Show Condition

Feeding for Show Condition

Whilst it is important for your horse to be in perfect condition for the show ring, you must always be aware of them putting on too much condition and the associated links with laminitis and being overweight. Weight can be assessed accurately on a weigh-bridge, but if this is not possible then a weigh tape can be used. Weigh tapes are a good way to monitor any changes in your horse’s weight but are not totally accurate and have been found to be inaccurate by as much as fifty kilograms. Blue Chip Original is the perfect feed balancer for show horses and ponies and contains optimum levels of vitamins and minerals, to meet the daily requirement of your horse or pony. With a comprehensive hoof supplement, SoundHoof, that includes biotin, lysine and organic zinc, and a respiratory supplement with garlic, menthol and eucalyptus to maintain lung health and integrity, you will not need to feed any additional supplements. Original is enhanced with generous levels of oils, for fantastic skin and a glossy coat. Blue Chip Original, like all the balancers in the Blue Chip range is whole-cereal and molasses free, making it very low in sugar and starch and contains the revolutionary ingredients Nucleotides, which are the building block of DNA and RNA and are essential for cell replication. Many horses will not put condition on if they are stressed and this can be evident after taking your horse to a show for the first time, some horses may even go on hunger strike for a few days afterwards! To help your horse keep calm and settled whilst at home use Blue Chip Karma. The natural ingredients in Karma include the superior, water-soluble form of magnesium, known...

Top 10 Tips For Horse Show Competing

Improving your preparation and ‘ring craft’ at shows can really help to ‘catch the judge’s eye’ and wow them with that winning performance.  Blue Chip founder and successful show horse producer Clare Blaskey has an enviable track record in the show ring.  Clare has won the Best Trained Show Horse at the National Championships ten times.  To see her latest winning performance on I’m Blue Chip Too, visit https://www.bluechipfeed.com/best-trained/ Clare has been placed at many major top shows including HOYS, where Clare’s horses have competed almost every year since she was 5 years old. Clare has put together her top tips for horse showing from her wealth of experience, to help improve confidence and help you show off your horse or pony to their best.     1. Before you start the horse show competing season, take a young or novice horse to a horse dressage competition.  Your horse can experience travelling and working in with other horses in a similar situation to a show, it is also an ideal opportunity to practise loading and unloading your horse.  There is nothing more frustrating than finding you cannot get your horse on the lorry the morning of a show.   2. Try to let other people of different sizes ride your horse in preparation for the judge riding them.  This way your horse will get used to the feel and weight of different horse riders.   3. Practise riding your horse with different contacts i.e. a light contact and a firmer one, as each judge will ride slightly differently.  Also practise riding transitions so that your horse moves smoothly from...